Owner of the document requires that the content be not remodified or redistributed.
Share |

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
New Mexico

Legislative activities

The New Mexico state legislature addressed distributed generation through New Mexico’s Solar Rights and Solar Recordation Acts in 1977 (NMSA § 47-3-1 et seq.) it then strengthened the law in 2007 by reducing a county or municipality’s ability to place restrictions on solar access. (SB 1031) [2]

“In February 2008, Governor Richardson signed legislation that directs utilities to include load management and energy efficiency programs in their resource portfolio (HB 305). It also sets a minimum threshold for action:
- By 2014, save 5% of total 2005 retail kWh sales
- By 2020, save 10% of total 2005 retail kWh sales

The new law defines load management as demand response and it distinguishes in its provisions between load management and energy efficiency. Furthermore, the new law mandates public utilities to file every three years with the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission a “comprehensive measurement, verification and program evaluation report” that evaluates energy and demand savings, cost-effectiveness of programs, and how well public utilities implement programs.” [1]


Regulatory activities

The New Mexico Public Regulation Commission had reviewed distributed generation prior to 1994 and included net metering by 2009. They also had reviewed demand side management by 2008. Also Time of Use rates for residential customers where approved in 2008. [3, 4, 5, 6]

“In September 2006, the Commission opened a proceeding to consider whether to adopt PURPA Standard 14 (“Time-Based Metering and Communications”) as enacted in EPACT 2005. The Commission has held several workshops as part of the proceeding and asked New Mexico utilities to file white papers on AMI and time-based rates. The utilities filed these white papers in December 2006 and January 2007, and presented them in January 2007 at the Commission’s Advanced Metering Utility Workshop.” [1]

Distributed generators include qualifying cogeneration, small power production facilities, and net metering generators.

Demand side management consists of the Interruptible service and load controlled air conditioning and water heating. Interruptible service allows the company to shut a predetermined portion of the customer’s load off from electric service for either a reduced rate on all the customer’s electric service or a credit for the time service is shut off. Load controlled air conditioning and water heating gives the company control of when to de-energized up to a maximum of 300 hours per calendar year.

Time of Use rates break the cost for electricity into on-peak or off-peak energy pricing.


Utilities and Rate Schedules

El Paso Electric
- El Paso Electric Residential Rates
- El Paso Electric Business Rates

PNM
- PNM Rates

Xcel Energy
- Xcel Energy Rates

See the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) for information on consumer-owned Cooperatives: http://www.nreca.org/members/MemberDirectory/Pages/default.aspx


State-Level Incentives

New Mexico has corporate and personal tax credits and exemptions for geothermal, solar, and wind. The state has bonds for CHP/ Cogeneration.

More information can be found in the Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE): http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/index.cfm?re=1&ee=1&spv=0&st=0&srp=1&state=NM


Additional Resources

State Energy Office:
- New Mexico Energy, Minerals and natural Resources Department Energy Conservation and Management Division

State Authority Dealing with Energy Regulation:
- New Mexico Public Regulation Commission
- Docket Search: http://www.nmprc.state.nm.us/results.html?q=Docket

New Mexico Statutes

Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE): http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/index.cfm?re=1&ee=1&spv=0&st=0&srp=1&state=NM


References

[1] Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials, Prepared by the U.S. Demand Response Coordinating Committee for The National Council on Electricity Policy, Fall 2008. URL: http://www.oe.energy.gov/DocumentsandMedia/NCEP_Demand_Response_1208.pdf
[2] Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency, New Mexico Solar Access Laws, 02/18/2010. URL: http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=NM02R&re=1&ee=1
[3] El Paso Electric Company, Your Home, Rate Tariffs. URL: http://www.epelectric.com/nm/residential/rate-tariffs-1
[4] El Paso Electric Company, Your Business, Commercial and Industrial Rate Tariffs. URL: http://www.epelectric.com/nm/business/rate-tariffs-1
[5] PNM, Electricity Rates. URL: http://www.pnm.com/regulatory/electricity_former_tnmp.htm
[6] Southwestern Public Service Company, Electric Rate Schedules. URL: https://www.xcelenergy.com/Save_Money_&_Energy/Residential/Rate_Options