Owner of the document requires that the content be not remodified or redistributed.
Share |

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Minnesota

Legislative activities

The Minnesota legislature has been working with issues that relate to smart grid since 1983 when they first enacted net-metering and then revised the law in 2001 including interconnection and operating standards. [2, 3]

“In May 2007, Governor Pawlenty signed the Next Generation Energy Act of 2007, which changes how conservation is measured from the amount spent on conservation to the amount of electricity conserved (House File 436). The law considers load management to be a conservation measure.” [1]

On issues loosely related to smart grid, Minnesota had already developed solar and wind access laws and easements, by 1978. In 1994 the Legislature also enacted the Radioactive Waste Management Facility Authorization Law (Minn. Stat. § 116C.779) which established the Renewable Development Fund (RDF). For solar and wind access the Minnesota Statute (§ 500.30) ensures that neighbors may voluntarily sign solar easements to ensure that proper access to resources is available to those who operate solar and wind energy systems. For the RDF Xcel Energy supports renewable-energy through payments into the RDF due to ongoing storage and operation of their nuclear power plant. [5, 4]


Regulatory activities

The Minnesota Public Utilities Commission had approved Time of Use rates by 2005 for business customers and residential customers by 2010. It also addressed issues on demand side management at both a residential and business level prior to 2006. By 2008 the Commission had addressed distributed generation with several optional rates. [6, 7, 8]

“In August 2007, the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission issued an Order in which it decided not to adopt PURPA Standard 14 (“Time-Based Metering and Communications”) as enacted in EPACT 2005 but decided instead to adopt a modified version of it—which it will apply on a “utility-by utility basis.”” [1]

Demand side management includes thermal storage systems, such as water heaters, that are controlled by the company and intermittent customer rates with variable load or backup distributed generators.

Distributed generators include backup generation, small power producers and qualifying net metering installations.

Time of Use or time of day rates break the cost for electricity, based on the utility, into seasonal periods with energy and demand priced on-peak, intermediate, or off-peak.


Utilities and Rate Schedules

Alliant Energy
- Alliant Energy Rates

Minnesota Power
- Minnesota Power Rates

Northwestern Wisconsin Electric Company

Otter Tail Power Co.
- Otter Tail Power Co. Rates

Xcel Energy
- Xcel Energy Residential Rates
- Xcel Energy Business Rates

See the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) for information on consumer-owned Cooperatives: http://www.nreca.org/members/MemberDirectory/Pages/default.aspx


State-Level Incentives

Minnesota offers PACE financing, wind and solar systems tax exemptions, grants for solar and renewable energy programs, and utility rebates for solar.

More information can be found in the Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE): http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/index.cfm?re=1&ee=1&spv=0&st=0&srp=1&state=MN


Additional Resources

State Energy Office:
- Minnesota Department of Commerce Office of Energy Security

State Authority Dealing with Energy Regulation:
- Minnesota Public Utilities Commission
- Docket Search: https://www.edockets.state.mn.us/EFiling/edockets/searchDocuments.do?method=showeDocketsSearch&searchType=new

Minnesota Statutes

Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE): http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/index.cfm?re=1&ee=1&spv=0&st=0&srp=1&state=MN


References

[1] Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials, Prepared by the U.S. Demand Response Coordinating Committee for The National Council on Electricity Policy, Fall 2008. URL: http://www.oe.energy.gov/DocumentsandMedia/NCEP_Demand_Response_1208.pdf
[2] Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency, Minnesota Interconnection Standards, 01/27/2010. URL: http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MN10R&re=1&ee=1
[3] Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency, Minnesota – Net Metering, 09/23/2009. URL: http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MN01R&re=1&ee=1
[4] Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency, Minnesota Renewable Development Fund (RDF), 03/17/2010. URL: http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MN09R&re=1&ee=1
[5] Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency, Minnesota Solar and Wind Easements, 10/27/2009. URL: http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=MN02R&re=1&ee=1
[6] Alliant Energy, Utility Rates & Tariffs Minnesota: Interstate Power & Light Electric. URL: http://www.alliantenergy.com/UtilityServices/UtilityRatesFacts/014824
[7] Minnesota Power, Electric Rate Book, 5/2/2008. URL: http://www.mnpower.com/CustomerService/Rates
[8] OtterTail Power Company, Rates, rules and regulations. URL: http://www.otpco.com/ElectricRates/RatesReferenceTable.asp#MN