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West Virginia

Legislative activities

The West Virginia state legislature has passed legislation expanding net-metering standards in 2009. (HB 103) [2]


Regulatory activities

The West Virginia Public Service Commission had started to address demand-side management by 1986. By 1994 the Commission had addressed Time-of-Use rates for industrials including demand based Time-of-Use rates, but had expanded to residential customers by 2008. Distributed generation schedules were established by 1984 with the inclusion of net metering by 2007. [3, 4]

Demand-side management includes interruptible, price curtailable and emergency curtailable rates. Interruptible rates provide a contracted quantity that the company does not consider firm supply. Price curtailable service has the company notify customers that the power markets price has reached the customer specified minimum price to curtail load and upon notification must de-energizing load so as to receive a monthly credit. Emergency curtailable service has the company notify customers who are responsible for de-energizing load and upon load reduction will receive a credit based on the duration of the emergency event.

Time-of-Use or Time-of-Day rates break the cost for electricity into either on-peak or off-peak energy pricing. Time-of-Use rates include demand based time-of-use where demand charges are broken into on-peak, off-peak, and shoulder-peak.

Distributed generation include qualifying cogeneration and small power production facilities where prices are negotiated and small net-metering customers where the price is provided in the tariff, contracted, or energy carried forward for up to twelve months for billing purposes.

“In December 2006, the Public Service Commission of West Virginia decided not to adopt PURPA Standard 14 (“Time-Based Metering and Communications”) as enacted in EPACT 2005, stating that it instead had adopted the collective recommendations of the parties to the proceeding. The parties to the proceeding recommended—via their October 2006 “consensus statement”—that the Commission not adopt PURPA Standard 14 but that “smart metering should be available as an option for members of all tariff classes.” The consensus statement included the following:

“The EPACT 2005 standards for smart metering found in section 1252 would not be adopted. However, electric utilities will explore making smart metering available as an option for all tariff classes in their next rate case, if the utility is not already providing this service. The utilities will address this issue in their applications in their next rate cases. The Parties agree that a cost benefit study is not immediately needed. However, should future electric utility load growth begin to put undue pressure on utilities to increase rates, then the Commission may direct a utility or utilities to conduct such a study in a future rate case or general investigation.”” [1]


Utilities and Rate Schedules

AEP Ohio
- AEP Ohio Rates

Allegheny Power
- Allegheny Power (Potomac Edison) Rates
- Allegheny Power (Manongahela Power) Rates

Appalachian Power Company
- Appalachian Power Company Rates

See the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) for information on consumer-owned Cooperatives: http://www.nreca.org/members/MemberDirectory/Pages/default.aspx


State-Level Incentives

West Virginia offers a corporate tax exemption for wind energy generation, personal tax credits for solar, and property tax incentives for wind.

More information can be found in the Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE): http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/index.cfm?re=1&ee=1&spv=0&st=0&srp=1&state=WV


Additional Resources

State Energy Office:
- West Virginia Department of Commerce Division of Energy

State Authority Dealing with Energy Regulation:
- West Virginia Public Service Commission
- Docket Search: http://www.psc.state.wv.us/webdocket/default.htm

West Virginia Code

Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency (DSIRE): http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/index.cfm?re=1&ee=1&spv=0&st=0&srp=1&state=WV


References

[1] Demand Response and Smart Metering Policy Actions Since the Energy Policy Act of 2005: A Summary for State Officials, Prepared by the U.S. Demand Response Coordinating Committee for The National Council on Electricity Policy, Fall 2008. URL: http://www.oe.energy.gov/DocumentsandMedia/NCEP_Demand_Response_1208.pdf
[2] Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency, West Virginia – Net Metering, 07/02/2009. URL: http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=WV03R&re=1&ee=1
[3] Allegheny Power, West Virginia Electric Tariffs (Monongahela Power). URL: http://www.alleghenypower.com/Tariffs/WV/Wvmontariffs/wvmontariff.asp
[4] Appalachian Power Company Wheeling Power Company, Rate Schedules Terms and Conditions of Service Governing Sale of Electricity in West Virginia. URL: https://www.appalachianpower.com/global/utilities/lib/docs/ratesandtariffs/WestVirginia/2011_Tariff_Sheets.pdf